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dc.contributor.authorFindikli, Ebru
dc.contributor.authorCamkurt, Mehmet Akif
dc.contributor.authorIzci, Filiz
dc.contributor.authorYavuz, Yasemin Coskun
dc.contributor.authorFindikli, Huseyin Avni
dc.contributor.authorAltun, Hatice
dc.contributor.authorDogan, Ekrem
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T12:10:23Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T15:57:43Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T12:10:23Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T15:57:43Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2146-1473
dc.identifier.issn2146-2380
dc.identifier.urihttps://dx.doi.org/10.5455/jmood.20160321034554
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11446/2569
dc.descriptionWOS: 000387949500005en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To determine the affective temperament profile of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) in comparison to healthy subjects and to evaluate depression and anxiety status of patients. Methods: This was a case-control study into which 122 CRF patients (63 males, 59 females) and 100 healthy age-and gender-matched controls (66 females, 34 males) were included. The affective temperament profile was determined by Turkish version of Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A). For the assessment of depression and anxiety, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used. Results: Of the 122 patients, 28 (23%) were in predialysis, 22 (18%) periton dialysis, 30 (24.6%) hemodialysis and 42 (34.4%) transplantation. The majority of participants (n=169, 76.1%) had no dominant affective temperament according to TEMPS-A. For the remaining participants, the most common dominant affective temperament was depressive temperament (8.6%) followed by mixed temperament (7.7%) and anxious temperament (2.7%). There was no signifcantly difference in terms of affective temperament traits between patients and controls. Patient group had significantly higher depression and anxiety scores than healthy controls. There was no correlation between laboratory results and affective temperaments, anxiety, depression scores of patients. There was no significant difference between predialysis, periton dialysis, hemodialysis, and transplantation subgroups in terms of anxiety, depression or affective temperament traits (p>0.05 for all). Conclusion: There is no affective temperament profile specific to patients with CRF. However, considering the high rate of depression and anxiety among patients with CRF, knowing affective temperament profile of patients will guide clinicians through management of psychiatric disorders and CRF itself, thus will improve disease outcome and patients' quality of life.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherYERKURE TANITIM & YAYINCILIK HIZMETLERI A Sen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.5455/jmood.20160321034554en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen_US
dc.subjectrenal failureen_US
dc.subjectdialysisen_US
dc.subjectaffective temperamenten_US
dc.subjectanxietyen_US
dc.subjectdepressionen_US
dc.titleA Case-Control Study on the Affective Temperament Profiles, Anxiety and Depression Levels of Patients with Chronic Renal Failureen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.journalJOURNAL OF MOOD DISORDERSen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDBÜen_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.startpage133en_US
dc.identifier.endpage139en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US


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